Artists – L to Z

Yoko Ono

Born in Japan on 13 February 1933, Yoko Ono finished her education in the USA and became a well-known figure during the 1960s in New York avant-garde art circles, making films and organizing "happenings". She met John Lennon at an art exhibition in London, and Yoko (previously married with one child, Kyoko) married him on(...)

Yothu Yindi

This multiracial Australian band (the name is an Australian aboriginal phrase for 'Mother Child') blended native and white sounds and sentiments. Yothu Yindi were founded in 1986, the year of Australia's bicentennial, and practiced a highly politicised and nationalistic form of music making. Drawing from sounds as diverse as the didgeridoo and the electric guitar,(...)

You Am I

Centered around the prolific songwriting skills of singer/guitarist Tim Rogers, You Am I is one of the most successful and internationally admired Australian bands of the 1990s. Rogers formed You Am I in December 1989 with school friend Nick Tischler and older brother Jaimme Rogers. Mixing the gritty early 70s raunch of The Rolling Stones,(...)

Young Homebuyers

Young Homebuyers hailed from Adelaide, Australia, and pivoted around the songwriting team of Nigel Lawrence and Greg Williams, who met at high school. In their original incarnation, the band were heavily into satire, offering hilarious stage parodies of The Police, Billy Joel, Redgum and others, with songs like It's Still Billy Joel To Me, Penguins Took My(...)

Young Marble Giants

Formed in 1978, the band took its name from a book on Greek sculpture and their cues from Kraftwerk and The Velvet Underground. An elusive simplicity became the trademark of the Cardiff trio, with Stuart Moxham's muted guitar riffs and toytown organ, his younger brother Phil's staccato bass lines and Alison Statton's measured, haunting vocals. A vinyl debut(...)

Young Modern

Adelaide band Young Modern was one of Australia's pioneering power pop/new wave bands of the late 1970s. Vocalist John Dowler formed the band (taking their name from a 1960s magazine) when his previous band, Spare Change, broke up. Combining the musical stylings of The Beatles, Rolling Stones, The Kinks, The Byrds and The Who, the(...)

Young Rascals, The

The Young Rascals (the 'young' prefix was dropped when the band members left their teens) initially gained a following in New Jersey around 1965, particularly the Choo Choo Club in Garfield, where they made their debut in January of that year. Next followed a three-month residency on The Barge, off Southampton, Long island - where(...)

Young Tradition, The

Peter Bellamy, Royston Wood and Heather Wood (no relation) came together in April 1965 as The Young Tradition. While the Incredible String Band and Fairport Convention were boldly adding sitars and electric guitars to take folk music in brave new hybrid directions, The Young Tradition were approaching its proud heritage from the opposite direction by rejuvenating(...)

Youngbloods, The

Native New Yorkers The Youngbloods formed under the leadership of Jesse Colin Young in 1967 and played soft rock numbers with a light jazz feel, successfully avoiding the pitfall of playing cocktail pseudo-jazz. Young got his start on the folk circuits of Boston and New York, and had already cut a couple of solo albums(...)

Yvonne Barrett

Born in 1946, Yvonne Barrett became a regular on Australian pop television show The Go! Show in the 1960's, which resulted in a successful career as a solo pop singer. During the 1970's she moved into session work and club appearances, but by the 1980's was working as a waitress in Sydney. On 3 September 1985, Yvonne(...)

Zenda Jacks

Billed as "The Goddess of Rock", Zenda Jacks (whose real name was Sue McCloskey) was Magnet Records' Glam answer to Suzi Quatro. Her first single, Rub My Tummy, became a UK radio hit but never made the charts. Two other singles followed: Earthquake and Do You Love Me?. In 1975 she had her own band Stormbringer. Jacks joined Silver(...)

Zipps, The

The Zipps formed in Holland in 1965 from the remains of popular local folk group The Beat Town Skifflers. They were soon signed by the Muziek Express label, and recorded their only single for the label (Highway Gambler) in 1966. Playing shows across the country they soon met Ben Katerberg who was able to help the(...)

Zombies, The

The Zombies were the only British group of the 60s who could have seriously given The Beatles a real run for their money. Although comparatively unrecognised, their body of work is every bit as innovative, complex and appealing as that of the Fab Four. Without a Brian Epstein, a George Martin, and the marketing might of The Beatles machine(...)

Zoot

Zoot

When Australian band Zoot moved from their hometown of Adelaide (where they had played as Times Unlimited and Down The Line) to Melbourne in 1968, their management gave them a bubblegum image, centred on the slogan "Think Pink, Think Zoot". The band dressed entirely in pink outfits. It took the band until 1970 to shake the image(...)

Zoot Money’s Big Roll Band

The most fondly remembered London club act of the 1960s was, perhaps, Zoot Money's Big Roll Band whose Big Time Operator was their only Top 30 entry. George Bruno Money acquired his stage name at his Dorset secondary school through his verbose worship of saxophonist Zoot Sims. However, his jazz purity polluted by rock 'n' roll, young(...)

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