Civil rights

Black Panthers

Black Panthers

The Black Panthers wanted to be the vanguard of a revolution that would create economic, social and political equality across gender and colour lines. Since the non-violent campaign of Martin Luther King had ended in that brave man’s death and little improvement of minority rights, the Panthers saw their only option as one of violence. They preached(...)

Black Power

1966 was, in all respects, a crucial turning point for the black movement in America. In that year the Black Panther party was founded in Oakland, California, and Stokely Carmichael coined the slogan of 'Black Power'. The failure of the US anti-poverty programme and the struggle in the black community over control of funds precipitated a crisis -(...)

Civil Rights Movement

In December 1955, in Montgomery, Alabama, a black woman named Rosa Parks insisted on sitting in the front of a bus. The segregation laws in America's deep south reserved the front section of public buses for whites, although most bus passengers in Montgomery were blacks and the front section was often almost empty. Rosa Parks was arrested(...)

Malcolm X

1 9 2 5 - 1 9 6 5 Malcolm X (born Malcolm Little) was a leader of the Black Muslim movement whose separatist views were directly opposed by the non-violent civil rights movement led by Martin Luther King. His philosophy of raising black consciousness and of direct action influenced the Black Power movement of the late 1960's. He(...)

Martin Luther King Speech (28 August 1963)

"There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the coloured citizen is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges. . . . We cannot be satisfied as long as the coloured person's basic mobility is from(...)

Rosa Parks

On 1 December 1955, in Montgomery, Alabama, a black woman named Rosa Parks insisted on sitting in the front of a bus. The segregation laws in America's deep south reserved the front section of public buses for whites (although most bus passengers in Montgomery were blacks and the front section was often almost empty). Rosa(...)