Glam

Alvin Stardust

Born Bernard Jewry in the 1940s, Alvin Stardust shot to stardom in the 1970s. He had already had four hit singles in the 1960s under the name of Shane Fenton (with The Fentones) before moving into management, looking after The Hollies and Lulu, among others. But what fun is it, watching other people get all the fame and accolades? There(...)

David Bowie

David Bowie

Born in January 1947, David began his musical career playing drums in a dance band, wearing a bowtie and playing the Hokey Cokey. Initially little more than an impersonator of early 60s novelty pop singer Anthony Newley, Bowie wisely neutered his South London barrow-boy twang in time to conquer the 70s. As Davy Jones he fronted The(...)

Gary Glitter

Gary Glitter

Paul Gadd was born in Banbury, Oxfordshire, on 8 May 1944. He changed his name to Paul Raven and recorded several singles during the 1960's - when he was a regular at the 2i's and the Safari Club in Swinging London - but without much success. Deterred, he took up the job of a warm-up man(...)

Glam Rock

Glam Rock

Glam Rock laughed in the face of the pompous pseudo-intellectualism that was becoming prevalent in the music world in the early seventies. It declared war on seriousness. You want three day weeks? We want Can The Can. You want Tales From Topographic Oceans? We want Tiger Feet. It is, of course, the sweetest of all ironies that Marc Bolan - the(...)

Glam Top 20

Glam Top 20

From the halcyon days of flying-V guitars, pink trousers, silver satin jackets and glitter on the cheekbones, I present here for your listening pleasure the Nostalgia Central Glam Top 20. Apologies for the absence of any tracks by Slade. The mirror-hatted wonders are conspicuous by their absence from Spotify. Otherwise the list would have included the following tracks also.(...)

Glitter Band, The

The Glitter Band (originally - though briefly - called The Glittermen) were formed by producer Mike Leander in 1972 as backing and session musicians for Gary Glitter. Several of the band had played with Glitter in The Boston Showband during the 1960s when he was still known as Paul Raven. The band provided the backing music for(...)

Hush

Hush

One of the defining moments of Australia's 1970s pop legacy was undoubtedly Hush performing Bony Moronie on Countdown. This updated version of the old Larry Williams rocker was a #1 for Hush in September 1975. It was the perfect vehicle for the band's flashy hi-jinks. English-born lead singer Keith Lamb would wiggle his butt in his satin flares,(...)

Jook

Formed in 1971, Jook were the brainchild of Sparks manager John Hewlett, who introduced guitarist Trevor White to singer-songwriter Ian Kimmett and recruited bassist Ian Hampton and ex-John's Children drummer Chris Townson. The band name - also courtesy of Hewlett - was inspired by the song Duke (Jook) of Earl. Jook's uniform of braces, boots, and cropped hair drew a loyal skinhead following,(...)

Mott The Hoople

Mott The Hoople

Mott the Hoople took their name from the title of a 1966 novel written by Willard Manus, about a man named Norman Mott who called himself Mott the Hoople. The six months following the release of their self-titled debut album in 1969 found the band working at a ferocious pace, averaging over 20 gigs a(...)

Mud

Originally formed in 1966, Mud bumbled along for a bit before being taken under the wing of RAK and the Midas-like Chinn and Chapman song writing partnership. They'd already done wonders for The Sweet, what could they do for Mud? In 1972, RAK and Mud were a partnership made in heaven. RAK was interested in(...)

Roxy Music

At the end of 1971, an embryonic Roxy Music, comprising David O'List (guitar) Brian Eno (synths), Andy Mackay (sax/oboe), Graham Simpson (bass), Paul Thompson (drums) and ex-Newcastle Art School student Bryan Ferry - who once auditioned as lead vocalist with King Crimson but did not get the gig - (vocals/keyboards) played two tiny gigs at Reading University, as(...)

Rubettes, The

Wayne Bickerton and Tony Waddington knew they had a hit when they wrote Sugar Baby Love. Without an act to record it they did what many others were doing at the time and put together a group of session singers and went into the studio. With Paul DaVinci on lead vocals, it became a bigger hit(...)

Slade

Slade

Slade started life as The N'Betweens (pictured above) in 1966 and enjoyed modest local success, before recording a single - the excellent Kim Fowley-produced Young Rascals cover, You Better Run. The single did not chart and the band did not record again for well over two years, although they continued to build a powerful reputation on the live circuit. By 1969(...)

So You Wanna Be a Glam Rocker? – Glam Fashion in the 1970s

One of the best things about Glam fashion was that it was always available, and never overpriced. It had the effect of making its superstars somehow seem more human, more approachable. One of the most universally desired sex symbols of Glam was Sally James, star of probably the greatest Glam kids television show ever, Tiswas. She(...)

Suzi Quatro

Suzi Quatro

Suzi Quatro was born Susan Quatrocchio in Detroit on 3 June 1950 - the daughter of Detroit jazz band leader Art Quatro. Suzi's professional career started in the mid-Sixties when under the name Suzi Soul she became a TV Go-Go dancer. She later teamed up with her two sisters to form The Pleasure Seekers, an outfit(...)

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