Founded in 1926 by Leicester-born composer and music publisher Lawrence Wright, Melody Maker was one of the earliest British weekly music newspapers. The publication mainly covered jazz until Chris Welch and Ray Coleman applied deeper perspectives to American-influenced local rock and…

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First published as Fabulous in January 1964 (with The Beatles on the cover) and aimed squarely at the teenage market, the magazine’s big selling point was the full-page colour pin-ups not yet found anywhere else. At its peak, Fabulous enjoyed…

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Launched two years after the NME, and founded by former Weekly Sporting Review editor Isidore Green, Record Mirror never attained the circulation of its rival, though it published the first UK album chart in 1956. By the end of 1960, circulation…

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British music paper Sounds appeared in 1970 with a weekly colour centrefold and robust rock music coverage. Sounds came early to the punk scene thanks to John Ingham and Giovanni Diadomo. Other significant contributors included Garry Bushell, Sandy Robertson, Mick Middles, Phil Sutcliffe,…

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Los Angeles group The Beethoven Soul formed around 1966 and released their sole (self-titled) album in 1967 – a glorious collection of baroque-tinged sunshine pop. The band broke up in 1970, with bassist John Lambart, keyboard player Dick Lewis and…

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1 9 6 6 (UK) 13 x 5 minute episodes 1 9 7 1 (UK) 13 x 5 minute episodes Originally part of the Watch with Mother children’s series, Joe was a lovely little still frame animation concerning the titular little boy and his family.…

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This Detroit punk-pop outfit – formed in 1977 – was led by the candy-voiced rocker Nikki Corvette (born Dominique Lorenz) and Romantics guitarist Peter James. They had a sound somewhere between The Go-Go’s and The Ramones, with bubblegum teenage libido maxed…

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In 1981, a folk-rock singer named Susanna Hoffs rang up a couple of garage-rocking sisters from Northridge on the northern rim of the San Fernando Valley called Debbi and Vicki Peterson. The Peterson girls had placed an ad in a…

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Formed in Sydney, Australia, in 1986, The Hummingbirds comprised singer/guitarist (and principal songwriter) Simon Holmes, singer/guitarist Alannah Russack, singer/bassist Robyn St Clare and drummer Mark Temple. Their debut single Alimony (July 1987) was followed by three more singles, Get On Down (January…

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Beginning in 1969, Greg Shaw’s Who Put The Bomp was a fanzine for aficionados of such then-unfashionable future New Wave building blocks as Surf Music, Girl Groups, Power Pop and Garage Rock. Many of the mag’s contributors were inspired to…

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The brainchild of a young Berkeley dropout named Jann Wenner (pictured above), Rolling Stone magazine was founded in 1967 with a mere $7,500 and a few volunteers on the second floor of a San Francisco print shop. Debuting on 9…

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It remains the defining assembly of rock music – an unprecedented gathering of at least 300,000 young, long-haired, raggedy-clad Americans “going up the country” in New York’s Catskill Mountains, searching for answers, hoping for transcendence . . . and finding,…

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Purveyors of super-slick pop, this UK band derived their unusual name from a friend called Johnny, who – you guessed it – literally did not like jazz. Johnny Hates Jazz were the perfect late-80s band. Perfect because they sounded super…

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Back in 1963, the British public was stunned to learn that War Minister John Profumo had been sharing the sexual favours of model-showgirl Christine Keeler with Soviet naval attache (and suspected Russian spy) Eugene Ivanov. The three had been brought together by…

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There has always been fast food of sorts, but 1950s America put mass-produced, flavour-rich but nutritionally-poor fast food on the culinary map. It was the decade that quick-service restaurant chains began to open and franchise, heralding a seismic shift in…

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Tiger Beat was founded in September 1965 by Charles “Chuck” Laufer, his brother Ira Laufer, and television producer and host Lloyd Thaxton. Marketed primarily to adolescent girls, the magazine featured teen idol gossip and articles about movies, music and fashion.…

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From humble beginnings in 1952 when publisher Maurice Kinn bought the title The Musical Express & Accordion Weekly for £1000 and re-branded it as New Musical Express, the NME became an essential weekly purchase for generations of music fans, populated by characters as notorious…

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Kiddies construction toy “Stickle Bricks” was invented by Denys Fisher in 1969. The colourful plastic shapes – squares, rectangles, triangles and circles – could be interlocked using “teeth” and joined together in many different ways.

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By the late 1970s, Dungeons & Dragons had become a favourite pastime of certain types of too-smart-for-their-own-good, socially awkward adolescents who preferred to think of themselves as Chaotically Good Elves in a mystic realm rather than as the Chaotically Dressed…

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“Turn On, Tune In, Drop Out” From 1960 onwards, while teaching psychology at Harvard, Timothy Leary began experimenting with drugs on prison inmates and then on himself and his friends. Leary was soon dismissed by Harvard and set up his…

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American born promoter Lee Gordon arrived in Sydney in 1953, after a chance meeting with an Australian used car salesman, and immediately put his American know-how to work. Gordon was responsible for bringing 472 American entertainers (including Nat King Cole,…

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Harold Edward Holt was born in Sydney in 1908 and educated at Melbourne University. He worked as a solicitor and entered the federal parliament in 1935 for the United Australia (later Liberal) Party. He was minister of labour in 1940/1941…

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January 01 – Chinese and North Korean forces advance across the 38th Parallel and through UN lines. 01 – First episode of The Archers is broadcast nationally on the BBC Light Programme. 01 – Bill Byford (Saxon) born. 04 – Communist…

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In 1966 England hosted the World Cup, in a climate of football fever generated in-part by the much-loved mascot World Cup Willie. The cartoon lion appeared on everything from beer to breakfast cereals. Of the 16 nations that reached the final…

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January 01 – The US gives $216 million in aid to South Vietnam. 01 – The 1955 Cotton Bowl Classic American football game is won by the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets. 02 – President José Antonio Remón Cantera is assassinated…

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January 01 – Groucho Marx dies in Los Angeles. 02 – Legendary jazz pianist and composer Erroll Garner dies. 03 – Former Home Secretary Roy Jenkins announces he is leaving Westminster to become President of the European Commission in Brussels. Conservative…

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January 01 – French singer Maurice Chevalier dies (b. 1888) in Paris. He is 83. 03 – An IRA bomb injures 55 women and children when it explodes in a Belfast department store. 04 – Rose Heilbron is the first…

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January 01 – Britain, Denmark and Ireland join the European Economic Community (the “Common Market”) bringing the total number of member states to nine. 01 – Baseball star Roberto Clemente is killed in a light plane crash off Puerto Rico.…

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Infamous ‘Granny Killer’ John Wayne Glover began his reign of terror at Mosman in Sydney’s north, murdering six elderly women over a 13-month period in 1989 and 1990. Each time the calculating serial killer struck he would force his victim…

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January 01 – In Britain, Alf Ramsey is knighted and Bobby Moore gets an OBE in the New Years Honours. 01 – 48-hour ceasefire ends in Vietnam with B-52s attacking the DMZ. 01 – All Night Rave at The Roundhouse…

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