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Hound Dog Man (1959)

This 20th Century Fox production was set in the backwoods around 1912 and presented the adventures of young Clint Kinney (16-year-old rock ‘n’ roll singer Fabian in his screen debut) and his kid brother Spud (Dennis Holmes).

The boys take a great liking to footloose 20-year-old Blackie Scantling (Stuart Whitman) – the ‘hound dog man’ of the title – who just wanders off the road into their farm one day and are in seventh heaven when they are allowed to go on a hunting trip for racoon, catfish and wild turkey with the fun-loving, irresponsible Hound Dog Man.

But Clint is dismayed to find that Blackie shows interest in Dony Wallace (Carol Lynley). Clint considers women in general, and Nita Stringer (Dodie Stevens) – who has a crush on him – in particular, nothing more than a nuisance.

When the boys discover their neighbour, Dave Wilson (L.Q. Jones) thrown from a horse with his leg broken, they take him to his home. Everybody tries to help out, but the crusty, alcoholically-inclined doctor, Doc Cole (Edgar Buchanan) announces that Dave’s leg will be all right.

This gives the neighbours cause for a “bone-setting” party and it is here that the boys discover – during a showdown with local strongman Hog Peyson (Claude Akins) –  that Blackie doesn’t always behave like the hero he should. The time has come for them to lose some of their naivete.

All accompanied by plenty of singin’ and dancin’ – Fabian sings five rock ‘n’ roll numbers – and a rollicking good barn dance scene, even featuring Grandma Wilson (Jane Darwell) who “hasn’t danced in years”.

Clint McKinney
Fabian
Blackie Scantling
Stuart Whitman
Dony Wallace
Carol Lynley
Aaron McKinney
Arthur O’Connell
Nita Stringer
Dodie Stevens
Cora McKinney
Betty Field
Fiddling Tom Waller
Royal Dano
Susie Bell Payson
Margo Moore
Hog Peyson
Claude Akins
Doc Cole
Edgar Buchanan
Grandma Wilson
Jane Darwell
Dave Wilson
L.Q. Jones
Amy Waller
Virginia Gregg
Spud McKinney
Dennis Holmes
Rachel Wilson
Rachel Stephens

Director
Don Siegel