Home Movies by Decade Movies - 1950s Mother Riley Meets the Vampire (1952)

Mother Riley Meets the Vampire (1952)

A mad scientist known as ‘the Vampire’ (Bela Lugosi) comes to England to complete experiments in his mad plan for world domination using an army of robots. Unfortunately, the radar-controlled robot (Tom Macaulay) which he has had shipped to him is delivered instead to Mother Riley (Arthur Lucan).

Using radar control, the Vampire has the Robot transport itself to the correct destination – taking Old Mother Riley with it!

The old lady goes into a whirl of side-splitting action in a determined effort to frustrate the plans of the sinister Vampire. Most of the comedy involves groan-worthy slapstick, pratfalls and music hall-era gags.

Bela Lugosi had been on a theatre tour of England in Dracula when the production abruptly ended because the producers declared bankruptcy and absconded without paying anyone.

Lugosi found himself stranded in London with no money and no way to get back to the US.

Producer Richard Gordon, a friend of Lugosi’s who was based in England, heard about his plight and arranged for him to appear in this, the latest – and, as it turned out, the last – in the ‘Old Mother Riley’ series of comedies (which had been running since the 1930s), for which Lugosi was paid $5,000.

There are some interesting cameos from Dora Bryan, Hattie Jacques, John Le Mesurier and Laurence Naismith.

Released in some markets as Vampire Over London and My Son, The Vampire.

Mother Riley
Arthur Lucan
The Vampire
Bela Lugosi
Tilly
Dora Bryan
Anton
Philip Leaver
PC Freddie
Richard Wattis
The Yokel
Graham Moffatt
Julia
María Mercedes
Douglas
Roderick Lovell
Mugsy
David Hurst
Mugsy’s Assistant
Bill Shine
Freda
Judith Furse
Hitchcock
Ian Wilson
Mrs Jenks
Hattie Jacques
Mrs Mott
Dandy Nichols
Nasty Boy
David Hannaford
Sir Joshua Bing
Charles Lloyd Pack
BBC Announcer
Peter Bathurst
Robot Mark 1
Tom Macaulay
Police Brass
Cyril Smith
Scotland Yard Man
John Le Mesurier
Police Sergeant
George Benson
Police Sergeant at Desk
Laurence Naismith

Director
John Gilling