1 9 6 7 (UK) 4 x 30 minute episodes Premiering on Monday 2 January 1967, this four-part BBC2 comedy series was set in suburbia and revolved around married couple Bro (Edwin Apps) and Middie (Pauline Devaney) Paradock, characters from the…

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1 9 6 7 (UK) 3 x 90 minute episodes Premiering on Monday 2 January 1967, and aired as part of the Theatre 625 programme, BBC2 presented this Evelyn Waugh trilogy – acclaimed as one of the finest works of fiction…

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1 9 6 7 (UK) 8 x 25 minute episodes Following the critically mauled The Late Show, John Bird and John Fortune moved on to A Series of Bird’s.  Breaking away from their established sketch comedy pattern, each episode of this new…

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1 9 6 6 – 1 9 6 7 (UK) 23 x 40/30 episodes Premiering on Saturday 15 October 1966, this attempt by the BBC to recapture the success of the political satire programmes That Was The Week That Was, Not…

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1 9 9 4 (UK) 5 x 30 minute episodes Premiering on Friday 21 January 1994, this late-night BBC Scotland series for BBC2 presented sharp, topical comedy with Scottish comedian Craig Ferguson bringing his unique brand of humour to a series…

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1 9 6 8 (UK) 6 x 60 minute episodes This gangland drama from Granada followed the fortunes of South London crime boss Alan Spindoe across six one hour episodes. Alan Spindoe (Ray McAnally) was sent down for seven years for…

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1 9 6 8 (UK) 10 x 30 minute episodes Premiering on Wednesday 8 May 1968, the 10-week ATV series It Must be Dusty presented pop singer Dusty Springfield with musical guests including Jimi Hendrix, Donovan, Kiki Dee, Manfred Mann, Scott Walker, The…

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1 9 7 7 – 1 9 7 8 (USA) 21 x 60 minute episodes One of television’s more serious attempts to explore the problems of adolescents, James at 15 starred Lance Kerwin as James Hunter, an intelligent, sensitive boy growing up in…

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1 9 7 3 – 1 9 7 5 (UK) 60 x 5 minute episodes Underground, overground, wombling free . . . Debuting on 5 February 1973 with the episode ‘Orinoco and the Big Black Umbrella’, the furry, long-nosed Wombles of…

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1 9 6 9 (Netherlands) 13 x 30 minute episodes In the early 16th century, during the Guelders Wars, the knight Floris van Rosemund (Rutger Hauer) returns home from a trip around the world – accompanied by the Indian fakir/doctor/alchemist Sindala…

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Alma Angela Cohen was born in London in May 1932. The family name was originally Kogin, from which emerged the stage name Alma Cogan. Following the family’s move to Worthing, 11-year-old Alma entered the Sussex Queen of Song competition and…

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In 1964, Jim (later Roger) McGuinn, David Crosby and Gene Clark began playing folk music in coffee houses around Los Angeles, calling themselves The Jet Set. They eventually got a rhythm section – drummer Michael Clarke and bassist Chris Hillman…

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The Australian music magazine Go-Set was launched in February 1966 by Phillip Frazer, a quietly spoken, blonde 19-year-old who had previously edited the Monash University paper Lot’s Wife. The title was an amalgam of the catchwords “go-go” and “jet set”. The…

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Beginning in 1969, Greg Shaw’s Who Put The Bomp was a fanzine for aficionados of such then-unfashionable future New Wave building-blocks as Surf Music, Girl Groups, Power Pop and Garage Rock. Many of the mag’s contributors were inspired to start…

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Long recognised as Australia’s foremost jazz, blues and soul singer, Renee Geyer (born 1953) issued 15 studio albums over the course of a 40+ year career. Best known for her rich, soulful, passionate and husky vocal delivery, Geyer was also…

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This witty and heart-warming Technicolor comedy was based on the phenomenally successful novel and Broadway and London plays concerning a batty Bohemian who, following the adoption of her orphan nephew, loses her money in the Wall Street crash, struggles desperately…

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By the early 1980s, thanks to hits like Pac-Man and Donkey Kong, video arcade games were starting to take on a playful, cartoon-like appearance. Sensing a trend, some bright executive at Nintendo decided to take the next logical step: create…

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Encouraged by the success of Atari, other companies tried dipping their joysticks into the home video game market in 1976. Coleco introduced Telstar Pong, while the Fairchild Camera and Instrument Company weighed in with the Fairchild Channel F; the first programmable…

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It was an Atari world back in the late 70s and early 80s, but Mattel’s Intellivison staged a pretty good coup. The Atari VCS (aka the 2600) was the untouchable juggernaut of the home video game world, with hundreds of titles under…

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The video game Donkey Kong was created by Shigeru Miyamoto and is owned by Nintendo. It follows the adventures of the eponymous gorilla and a clan of other apes and monkeys in an industrial construction setting – using barrels as…

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Atari had experimented with head-on racing games back in 1976 with Night Driver, but it took a licensed game from Namco (designers of Pac-Man and Dig Dug, among others) to really put the company at the head of the racing…

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This maze arcade game was developed by Namco in 1981 and released in 1982, licensed and distributed by Atari. The player controlled Dig Dug to defeat all enemies – “Pookas” (red creatures with comically large goggles) and “Fygars” (fire-breathing green…

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Atari’s first racer, the little-known 1974 game Gran Track 10, wasn’t the hit that everyone had hoped it would be. But rather than abandoning the idea, Atari decided to go bigger and better, and the following year, they released Indy…

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Gaming companies had launched primitive and clumsy portable consoles in the past, but it was the arrival of the Nintendo Game Boy that launched mobile gaming into the modern era. Reliable, simple, and bundled with Tetris, the Game Boy was…

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On 16 January 1979, a young Ukrainian woman jumped from the Russian cruise ship Leonid Sobinov in Sydney Harbour wearing only a red bikini. 18-year-old Lillian Gasinskaya, from Odessa, swam to shore and was found on a Pyrmont footpath on Sunday…

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January 01 – Flashing indicator lights become legal on motor vehicles in Britain. 10 – A BOAC Comet jet airliner on its way from Singapore to London comes down into the Mediterranean about 20 minutes after taking off from Rome.…

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January 01 – The US gives $216 million in aid to South Vietnam. 01 – The 1955 Cotton Bowl Classic American football game is won by the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets. 02 – President José Antonio Remón Cantera is assassinated…

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January 02 – 66 Football fans are killed when a barrier collapses at Ibrox Park in Glasgow following a match between old firm rivals Celtic and Rangers. A few seconds before the end of the match, as fans were already…

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January 01 – French singer Maurice Chevalier dies (b. 1888) in Paris. He is 83. 03 – An IRA bomb injures 55 women and children when it explodes in a Belfast department store. 04 – Rose Heilbron is the first…

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It remains the defining assembly of rock music – an unprecedented gathering of at least 300,000 young, long-haired, raggedy clad Americans “going up the country” in New York’s Catskill Mountains, searching for answers, hoping for transcendence . . . and…

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January 01 – Western Samoa becomes independent. 01 – The Beatles are turned down by Decca Records, whose A&R man Dick Rowe enters the history books when he advises them that “groups with guitars are out”. 03 – Fidel Castro…

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